CategoryHealth

Is Taurine Vegan?

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Taurine often used to never be vegan, but now it often is when you see it added to foods. This one’s going to take an explanation to understand. First, taurine only is found naturally in fish and meat. Plants do not make it. However, it’s not essential for human health, and the human body can produce it as needed. It’s considered a “semi-essential” amino acid, but it’s not used to form proteins...

Where Does Vitamin B12 Come From in Food?

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Vitamin B12 is the only essential vitamin or mineral that vegans can’t really get naturally. The best food sources overall are animal products. But while most people think that vitamin B12 is produced by animals, they’re wrong. It’s in fact produced by certain bacteria and archaea, which are both single-celled microorganisms. Animals ingest the B12 made from these and absorb them, just as humans...

How Much Nutritional Yeast Per Day is Too Much? [Data]

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At first, nutritional yeast tastes a little weird. But after you get used to it, it’s a great substitute in foods to get that “cheesy” flavor. You’ve likely noticed that it contains well over 100% of some vitamins on the nutritional label, and reasonably wondered if it was safe to eat in large amounts. So let’s find out. As far macro content goes, it’s all protein and fiber, so no real concerns...

How Soon After Taking Iron Supplements Will I Feel Better?

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Assuming that you’re actually iron deficient, the research I went over to write this post suggests it will take 8-12 weeks to resolve most deficiencies. I’ll break down the research briefly in the rest of this post. Note that if you’re not iron deficient, a supplement won’t do too much of anything for you (beyond a possible placebo effect). The Best Case Scenario: A Minor Iron Deficiency If you...

Is Monocalcium Phosphate Vegan?

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It’s typically safe to assume that monocalcium phosphate is vegan, although there might be a few rare cases where it’s not. It’s very common to see in baking soda, functioning as a leavening agent. So why is it not always vegan? To find out, let me quickly explain how monocalcium phosphate is made. Patents for chemical processes for creating monocalcium phosphate go back to the 1930s. The process...

Meat Withdrawal: Side Effects and Benefits from Going Meat-Free

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Meat withdrawal is a real thing. When you’ve depended on something for most (if not all) of your life, and suddenly take it away, there are going to be consequences. In the case of meat withdrawal, there are both potential benefits and side effects from suddenly going off meat. I’ll give you an overview of both the good and the bad in this post. Common Negative Side Effects of Not Eating Meat In...

Why Am I Gaining Weight on a Vegan Diet?

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Before you went vegan, you saw tons of stories of people losing weight on a vegan diet. But for some reason, you’ve started gaining weight. What gives? There are a few possible reasons. I’ll break down each of them in this guide, and you can see if you think any are causing your weight increase. First Things FIrst: Are You Actually Gaining Weight? This is not a silly question, I promise. When you...

A List of 25 Vegan Foods Highest in Fat

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Fat has been made out to seem evil over the last few decades, but more and more people are realizing that it’s not evil. You need at least some fat to be healthy. When you first switch to a vegan diet, a lot of your food sources of fat disappear. This can lead to cravings and actual health side effects. I’ve created a large nutritional database for vegan foods using data from the USDA. Then, I...

The 50 Best High Lysine Low Arginine Vegan Foods

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There’s a lot of research showing that a high lysine and low arginine diet is effective at preventing herpes symptoms like cold sores from appearing. Dairy is great for this, but obviously not an option on a vegan diet. Two things matter. First, the amount of lysine. You want to aim for at least1.5-3 grams of lysine per day. Secondly, you want a reasonably low amount of arginine. In other words...

The Best Way to Eat Kale for Nutrients (Research-Backed)

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Summary: Cooking kale lightly is the best way to eat it for nutrients. Steaming is the best overall, followed by stir-frying, and then boiling. Steaming results in the most overall carotenoids, antioxidants, and phenolic content. I’ve always heard arguments on both sides. Some say that raw kale is best, while others say that cooking it is best. Like most arguments on the Internet, they very...