CategoryHealth

Tired on a Vegan Diet? 7 Causes of Fatigue

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When most people switch to a vegan diet, they feel more energetic, or at least similar to how they felt before. But the adjustment is a lot harder for some. I see posts and comments often of vegans who report that they often feel tired, dizzy, weak, or hungry. In most cases, there’s an obvious issue with their diet that is easy to fix. I urge you not to give up if you’re experiencing these...

The Best Vegan Niacin Food Sources (Per Gram and Calorie)

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Niacin, otherwise known as vitamin B3, is used to produce energy, fatty acids, cholesterol, and more. It’s also a part of the DNA repair process. For adults, the recommended daily amount of niacin is 16 mg for men, and 14 mg for women. There’s also an upper limit of 35 mg. If you reach it, you will experience a “flushing” reaction, usually starting with your face. It’s not serious, but could...

The Best Vegan Selenium Food Sources [Table]

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Selenium is a mineral that is highly linked to cognitive performance. Research has shown that selenium deficiency is linked to cognitive decline in the elderly, although there may be other aspects involved as well. Regardless, you need selenium to be healthy, and it’s much harder to get on a vegan diet than one with animal products. The RDA for selenium for male or female adults is 55 mcg (µg)...

The Best Vegan Phosphorus Food Sources [Chart and List]

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Phosphorus is an important mineral used as a material when building cell membrane and nucleic acids, among other roles. In short, it primarily keeps your muscles and bones strong. A phosphorus deficiency is not common, and you typically don’t need to pay any extra attention to getting enough. Even on a vegan diet, it’s not difficult to get. I’ve put together a table of the top phosphorus sources...

The Best Vegan Food Sources of Tryptophan [Table]

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Tryptophan is an important essential amino acid that may be harder for you to get on a vegan diet (along with other amino acids like lysine and methionine). With that said, it’s still not difficult to meet the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) if you’re eating the right kind of foods. The RDA, which was set by the U.S. Institute of Medicine in 2002 is 5 mg/kg body weight for adults. For a 170...

Dairy Withdrawal: Symptoms From Dairy Detox

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Dairy withdrawal (or “detox”) is what happens when you stop consuming dairy. Withdrawal may or may not cause symptoms depending on the individual. Typical symptoms are relatively minor, and usually subside in about a week. Just like meat withdrawal, dairy withdrawal is common in many new vegans. So even though it’s not a medically documented condition, there’s probably some truth...

The Best Vegan Food Sources of Calcium [List + Chart]

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Refresher/Summary: Calcium is one of the hardest vitamins to get on a vegan diet. Adults should try and get at least 1,000 mg of calcium per day. The best plant based sources of calcium are seeds and dark leafy greens. If you have a serious calcium deficiency, it can lead to weaker bones and diseases like osteoporosis (1). Due to advertising growing up, we think of animal products like dairy as...

The Best Vegan Omega 3, 6, and 9 Food Sources [Table]

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The bad news for vegans is that the best sources of omega 3’s are fish. It’s a bit tougher getting omega 3 fats from plants. The good news is that vegans typically eat less junk food, and have a better ratio of omega 3 to 6 fats than omnivores. I’ll give you a brief background on why these types of polyunsaturated fatty acids are important to get in your diet, and then...

Seitan vs Chicken: Protein and Nutrition Comparison

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Summary: Chicken (breast) typically has a bit higher protein content than seitan, but it depends on the seitan recipe you use. Chicken is a complete protein, but seitan is low in lysine (otherwise great). Neither are particularly good for getting vitamins or minerals. Ever since I started playing sports, every nutrition article on training that had anything to do with protein said one thing...

The Best Vegan Food Sources of Copper [Table]

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Copper is important not only for pennies, but also for your body. In combination with iron, it’s used for making red blood cells, and is also important for collagen, which affects your bones, cartilage, and skin. If you’re too low on copper, you can develop anemia, hair problems, irritability, liver damage, and a loss of taste. The good news is that it’s easy to get enough copper, even on a vegan...